A Complete Lemon Button Fern Care Guide [Updated 2021] - Cellar Door Plants (2022)

If you’re looking for an easy houseplant that will look great anywhere you set it, the Lemon Button Fern is your answer! We love this beautiful and compact plant and highly recommend it for any new plant parents. As you will see in this guide, Lemon Button Fern care is fairly easy which makes this a great ‘no fuss’ beginner plant.

The Lemon Button Fern, scientifically known as Nephrologist cordifolia ‘Duffi’, is native to Asia and Northern Australia. The ‘lemon’ in the name is said to come from its golden green color and the citrus scent emitted when its leaves are crushed, though I have never been able to bring myself to crush any of its leaves. ‘Button’ comes from the adorable round leaves that are very unique for a fern. These ferns are actually the smallest species of the Boston Fern and certainly are one of the easiest and cutest ferns to grow indoors.

Our No Fuss Plants Guide will also give you a few more ideas for hardy houseplants.

1 Watering Your Lemon Button Fern

2 Sunlight and Humidity

3 Propagating a Lemon Button Fern

4 Benefits and Toxicity

5 Cleaning and Pruning

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6 Fertilizer and Type of Soil

6.1 Best Type of Soil for Optimal Lemon Button Fern Care

7 Pests and Problems

9 Final Words for Lemon Button Fern Care

10 PLANT CARE WITH CELLAR DOOR PLANTS

11 Frequently Asked Questions

11.1 How much light does a Lemon Button Fern need?

11.2 How do you take care of a Lemon Button Fern?

11.3 Do lemon button ferns like to be misted?

11.4 Are Lemon Button Ferns easy to care for?

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Watering Your Lemon Button Fern

Lemon Button Ferns prefer their soil to be consistently moist, but not sopping wet. To maintain this, the fern should be watered once the top inch of soil is dry. Slowly water it until water comes out of the drainage hole to ensure thorough watering. If the leaves appear limp and droopy, this is a likely indicator that the fern could use a drink. If foliage is turning yellow, this may indicate that the soil is consistently soggy, leading to root rot. If this occurs, cut back on watering and the plant will likely bounce back.

A Complete Lemon Button Fern Care Guide [Updated 2021] - Cellar Door Plants (1)

Sunlight and Humidity

As with the majority of ferns, Lemon Button Ferns are a plant that naturally grows under the protective foliage of trees. In the wild they are partially shaded, receiving mostly filtered light peaking between trunks, branches, and leaves of trees. To emulate this lighting in your house, it is best to keep this plant a few feet away from a South or West facing window. That being said, this is a plant that will likely do well in any direction of light. If placed near a bright window, adding a sheer curtain is a good way to filter light to avoid burning the leaves.

As for humidity, Lemon Button Ferns enjoy moisture just like other fern varieties. However, lemon button ferns are not as reliant on humidity to thrive as some other ferns. Unless your home is especially dry, a more common issue in the wintertime, your lemon button fern should be fine without any humidity modifications. Spritzing the fern once or twice a day never hurts though. If your house is on the dryer side, you can meet the lemon button fern’s humidity needs by simply placing it in a bathroom or on top of a pebble tray.

To make a pebble tray under your fern, cover a small plate or saucer in pebbles and place your planted pot on top of this. Pour water over the pebbles, but make sure the bottom of the pot is not making contact with the water level as this can lead to root rot. As the water evaporates from this tray, it will raise the humidity in the surrounding area.

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Propagating a Lemon Button Fern

The easiest way to propagate Lemon Button Ferns at home is through division. This can be done by taking the plant out of the soil and using clean shears or a knife to cut the plant into two or three sections, ensuring that each has both roots and fronds. The other way to propagate is through fern spores, but this method is tedious and takes months. If you wish to propagate your lemon button fern at home, I strongly recommend the division method.

Benefits and Toxicity

Ferns filter airborne pollutants including formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene from the air. Boston ferns specifically, which include lemon button ferns, also help to raise indoor humidity levels which can prevent illness and dry skin, especially in the colder months.

For more plants that do double time of looking beautiful and cleaning the air, we think you’ll also like: Best Plants for Air Purification

A Complete Lemon Button Fern Care Guide [Updated 2021] - Cellar Door Plants (2)

Cleaning and Pruning

Ferns often require some periodic tidying up to look their best. Some unsightly and dead growth may be found on the underside of the plant, the site of the oldest growth, and can be clipped with clean pruning shears or scissors. This process only needs to be done every couple of months.

Fertilizer and Type of Soil

Lemon Button Ferns should do well in any well-draining potting soil. Fertilizing every 2 to 4 weeks with a half-strength mix of fertilizer designed for house plants (20-20-20) will give it a boost during the growing season.

Best Type of Soil for Optimal Lemon Button Fern Care

Lemon Button Ferns should do fine in neutral potting soil but will grow fastest in soil that is slightly acidic. To make your soil more acidic you can mix in some sphagnum peat or coffee grounds before potting with it, but this is by no means necessary to keep your lemon button fern happy and healthy.

Pests and Problems

Lemon Button Ferns are susceptible to both mealybugs and spider mites, but fortunately, they are unlikely to get either pest. Signs of mealy bugs include stunted growth and wilting. To check for mealybugs, look at the underside of fronds and stems for white, oval-looking bugs that should easily be visible to the naked eye. Signs of spider mites include small and tightly packed yellow spotting on the leaves, and thin white webs stretching between parts of the plant.

To get rid of either pest you should thoroughly rinse the fern with a study stream of water to dislodge and wash away any bugs. Then it is best to spray the plant down with a mixture of soapy water or Neem oil. Both the rinsing and spray treatment should be repeated every 3 to 4 days until there are no more signs of the pests.

A Complete Lemon Button Fern Care Guide [Updated 2021] - Cellar Door Plants (3)

Repotting

Lemon button ferns are not particularly picky about the pot you give them to call home. Given their small size, there is not much of a reason for them to ever be homed in anything bigger than a 6-inch pot, but it will not harm them if you choose to do so. They also are an amazing terrarium plant as they love the humidity.

Love ferns just like us? Our 2021 Fern Care Guide covers every aspect of care for your ferns! Have you heard of the Maidenhair Fern or the Autumn Fern? There’s a different fern for every corner of your home!

Final Words for Lemon Button Fern Care

The perfect bathroom, terrarium, or side table plant, lemon button ferns add a dashing touch of yellow-green color and fluffy foliage to any room. Commonly sought after for their small size and ease of care, these ferns are cute as a button anywhere.

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PLANT CARE WITH CELLAR DOOR PLANTS

We here at Cellar Door Plants aim to help bring nature into your home. We feel like people nowadays are more distant from nature than ever before. How can we protect the earth with so much distance from everything living around us? While we are based in Seattle, Washington, our greenhouse is located in San Marcos, California.

We areavid plant loversso every plant sold is packaged and protected with care to guide it to your home safely. We have a wide selection of houseplants with care requirements ranging from easy-to-care-for home additions for beginners to more complicated varieties that require a more experienced grower.

If you’re interested in adding a Lemon Button Fern to your collection of plants, head over to our plant shopto purchase!

However, if you’re still not sure which plant is for you, check out ourMystery Plant Subscription Boxand you can have a different 4″ indoor plant delivered to your front door every month. This subscription box is perfect for plant lovers who have a hard time deciding on just one!

Frequently Asked Questions

How much light does a Lemon Button Fern need?

These plants in the wild typically grow under a collection of trees so they do best with mid-light conditions. If you are going to put it by a window, we recommend adding a sheer curtain to protect the leaves from burning.

How do you take care of a Lemon Button Fern?

A Lemon Button Fern is fairly easy to care for. They like to live in consistently moist soil with a little bit of sunlight but not direct.

Do lemon button ferns like to be misted?

Similar to other ferns, the Lemon Button Fern likes its moisture but unlike the others, they don’t require any additional humidity modifications. A spritz of moisture 1-2 times a day never hurts though!

Are Lemon Button Ferns easy to care for?

Yes! Lemon Button Ferns are hardy, low maintenance, and great plants for beginners

FAQs

How do you take care of a lemon button fern? ›

Water. As with most ferns, the lemon button fern should never be allowed to fully dry out. Water your fern at least once a week to ensure that the soil stays consistently moist. While these ferns appreciate consistent moisture, never waterlog the soil as it can lead to root rot.

Why is my lemon button fern turning brown? ›

Underwatering: If the leaves are turning brown and crispy and the soil has been very dry, your lemon button fern probably needs more water. Give it a good soak and try not to let it dry out as much in the future. You can also prune away any dead parts.

Why is my lemon button fern turning yellow? ›

Over or underwatering your Lemon Button Fern is the most common cause of issues. If you are underwatering your plant or there isn't enough humidity, the fronds may become brown and crispy. If your leaves are turning yellow or wilting, you may be overwatering your plant (or it may be getting too much sun!)

Do lemon button ferns need sunlight? ›

Known as the Lemon Button Fern, Nephrolepis cordifolia 'Duffii' prefers bright, indirect or filtered light indoors, evenly moist soil, and air that is not dry (see below for ways to increase humidity around your plant). Provide warm temperatures (60 ° F and above).

How do you keep ferns alive indoors? ›

All ferns love moisture and should be given humid conditions. In living rooms and family rooms, stand their pots on trays of damp pebbles or clay granules. Ferns also love being misted at regular intervals with tepid, soft water unless the humidity of the whole room is kept high through the use of a humidifier.

How often should you water button ferns? ›

Pellaea rotundifolia
Botanical Pronunciationpe-LEE-uh ro-tun-dih-FOH-lee-uh
Water NeedsModerate
Watering NeedsWater regularly - weekly, or more often in extreme heat.
Companion PlantsFoam Flower (Tiarella); Montbretia (Crocosmia); Sweet Box (Sarcococca); Flax Lily (Dianella); Cast Iron Plant (Aspidistra);
10 more rows

How often should you water lemon button fern? ›

A lemon button fern can survive in a very damp environment, but will also be okay if you let it dry out every once in a while. It's a plant that's easy to streamline to your other plants' watering schedules. Whether you're watering it more often or just once a week, it will perform for you.

Why is my lemon button fern dropping leaves? ›

If the leaves are wilting, it might be because it's getting too much or too little sun. Move it to a new location where it can be partially shaded or protected from the sun to help it regain its health. Button ferns grow best when the temperature is 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, which is ideal for a houseplant.

What does an overwatered fern look like? ›

The first sign that a fern is overwatered is usually yellowing or wilted leaves. One surefire way to determine if it's time to water a Boston fern is to touch the soil with your fingertip. If the surface of the soil feels slightly dry, it's time to give the plant a drink.

Should I mist button fern? ›

Make sure to keep your button fern in a humid environment (ideally, in 50 percent humidity). In winter, when heat and fires in the fireplace dry out the home, be sure to occasionally mist the leaves, particularly when they look droopy.

Can you put Epsom salt on ferns? ›

For fern care, you simply mix 2 tablespoons Epsom salt with a gallon of water and spray the mixture monthly on the ferns. Watch the video on this page for step-by-step instructions on foolproof fern care with Epsom salt — as well as on how to use it between layers of soil for healthy tomato plants.

Should I trim my button fern? ›

Button Fern Care Tips

Cut back on water and trim off damaged fronds. Check the plant's roots to see if they have rotted -- if they're mostly black, get rid of it.

Do lemon button ferns purify air? ›

Ferns are fantastic for removing common airborne pollutants — including formaldehyde, xylene, and toluene — which have been thought to cause headaches, trouble breathing, and the growth of cancerous cells. The Boston fern, which includes the lemon button variety, also combats winter dryness by raising indoor humidity.

How big do lemon button ferns get? ›

Lemon button fern plants (Nephrolepis cordifolia “Duffii” or “Lemon Buttons”) are a small variety of Boston fern. Usually growing no larger than 1 foot (31 cm.) tall, these ferns are excellent additions to arranged outdoor container plantings, as well as great for use indoors as a houseplant.

How do you take care of indoor ferns in the winter? ›

Water your ferns through the winter only when the soil completely dries out. Ferns suffer more from over-watering than under-watering. If your ferns takes on a little less color or loses a few leaves in the winter, do not be alarmed. They will return to full glory in the spring.

Why do my indoor ferns keep dying? ›

A dying fern is usually because of underwatering or the humidity is too low which saps moisture from the leaves causing them to turn brown and crispy. Indoor ferns prefer a humidity of 50% and require the soil to be consistently moist to prevent the leaves turning brown and dying.

Can ferns stay outside in winter? ›

Hardy ferns tolerate winter temperatures outdoors, according to Clemson Cooperative Extension, but many can also survive high heat. For this reason, hardy ferns are an excellent choice for year-round outdoor containers in most climates.

Can I use Miracle Grow on ferns? ›

Ferns prefer lightweight, moist, mostly well-drained soil. The best way to prepare the soil for ferns is to add Miracle-Gro® All Purpose Garden Soil to the planting area.

Can you propagate lemon button fern? ›

The easiest way to propagate a Lemon Button Fern is to trim off any baby ferns that sprout from the “runners”. You'll easily identify the runners if you see them, long tendrils that “run” from the base of the fern. You can also separate any rooted rhizome sections from a suitably mature plant.

What time of day should you water ferns? ›

Ferns need a lot of water during the spring and summer months when they're growing the most. Young shoots can die even if there is a slight overdrying. Every day, check to see if your plants need to be watered. In the summer, when the weather is hot, you should water them in the morning and at night.

Should I Bottom water a fern? ›

Ferns do not like to dry out (even for a few hours) so keep them well watered. A note on this; ferns prefer to be watered from the bottom. As above, ferns hate full sun; even midday and morning sun can be too much.

Do ferns like water on their leaves? ›

Most ferns like an evenly moist soil with regular waterings. Allowing the soil to dry out between waterings stresses these plants. Bushy ferns can be difficult to water. Try using a watering can with a long spout to direct the water to the center of the plant.

Why is my button fern getting crispy? ›

Why is my fern crispy? Fern fronds and leaves become crispy and dry when the plants are kept in an environment without enough humidity. Fern leaves will also become crispy if they are regularly exposed to too much direct sunlight or are underwatered.

Are button ferns hard to take care of? ›

Button Fern Indoor Requirements

Bright indirect light to part shade at most is best for these plants. A temperature range of 60 to 75 degrees F. (16-24 C.) is best but avoid any drafts. Cold drafts can be damaging, and dry, hot air can cause browning on the leaves.

What is best fertilizer for ferns? ›

Ferns are relatively light feeders compared to many other foliage plants. They prefer a balanced fertilizer, such as 20-10-20 or 20-20-20, with micronutrients applied at approximately 200 ppm nitrogen. Too much nitrogen can cause tip burn on the roots and leaves if the plant becomes dry.

Do ferns like coffee grounds? ›

It's also vital to use coffee grounds in a way that won't harm your plants or the microorganisms in the soil. The simple answer is that yes, ferns love coffee!

What to put on ferns to make them greener? ›

Epsom Salt for Ferns can do wonders! It can make your fern plants greener and lusher.

How do you save a dying lemon button fern? ›

If the leaves are wilting, it might be because it's getting too much or too little sun. Move it to a new location where it can be partially shaded or protected from the sun to help it regain its health. Button ferns grow best when the temperature is 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, which is ideal for a houseplant.

How much light do button ferns need? ›

House your button fern in a bright or even slightly shady spot, but not in direct sun. A sun-filled kitchen or living room is a good choice. Make sure to keep your button fern in a humid environment (ideally, in 50 percent humidity).

Can lemon button fern grow outside? ›

Usually growing no larger than 1 foot (31 cm.) tall, these ferns are excellent additions to arranged outdoor container plantings, as well as great for use indoors as a houseplant. Requiring a shady location with filtered light, growing lemon button ferns outdoors in the ground will require a frost-free growing zone.

These ferns are actually the smallest species of the Boston Fern and certainly are one of the easiest and cutest ferns to grow indoors.. As with the majority of ferns, Lemon Button Ferns are a plant that naturally grows under the protective foliage of trees.. As for humidity, lemon button ferns enjoy the moisture just like other fern varieties.. However, lemon button ferns are not as reliant on humidity to thrive as some other ferns.. Boston ferns specifically, which include lemon button ferns, also help to raise indoor humidity levels which can prevent illness and dry skin, especially in the colder months.. Lemon Button Ferns should do well in any well-draining potting soil.. Lemon button ferns should do fine in neutral potting soil but will grow fastest in soil that is slightly acidic.

In this article, we’ll give you all the information you need to know to successfully care for a lemon button fern.. The lemon button fern, sometimes called a fishbone fern and known as Nephrolepis cordifolia in Latin, is a Southern sword fern.. We’re about to contradict ourselves slightly here but lemon button ferns can be grown indoors, much like the crispy wave fern — as long as you live in a suitable environment.. You will probably be pleased to know that your lemon button fern can tolerate indirect light, low light, medium light, and bright light!. You don’t want your plant to come into contact with the water since the potting mix will draw the water up and your plant will start to rot.. If you have other plants that do require a stringent water routine, this fern will easily slide into that pattern so you can take care of all your plants in one go.. Whether you water it frequently or let it dry out every so often, your lemon button fern will perform for you.. Without a doubt, this is the simplest way to get new plants from your lemon button fern.. Don’t worry, you can harvest spores from older lemon button ferns to make new plants.. All ferns have different soral patterns so you’ll need to research the specifics of your lemon button fern before you try to get the spores.. This way you’ll remember that you’re growing lemon button ferns here.. Ferns are fantastic to grow in terrariums , especially the lemon button fern variety because it’s hardy than others and the smallest Boston fern.. Since these ferns are found growing wildly under tree canopies and in damp earth, terrariums are essentially the perfect place for you to grow your own lemon button.. Humans, cats and dogs can come into contact with your lemon button fern plant and be absolutely fine!

Origin New Zealand Scientific Name Pellaea rotundifolia Family Pteridaceae Common Name Button fern, Cliff brake, Green Cliff Brack Type Ground fern Maximum Growth 12 to 18 inches (30.5 to 46 cm) Watering Needs Water when the soil is slightly dry Light Requirements Low light Humidity 40 to 50% Soil A combination of soil, peat moss, and sand/gravel in 1:3 proportion.. Add 1 tsp of lime each per quart of mixture Fertilizer Monthly application of all-purpose houseplant fertilizer; Concentration must be diluted half the strength of the original recommendation Temperature 60 to 75 O F (16 to 24 O C) Pests Scale, mealybugs, spider mites Diseases Pathogenic, Propagation Can be grown from spores or the division of clumps Pruning Prune the button fern periodically Repotting Re-pot when necessary Toxicity Non-toxic to cats and dogs USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 9 through 12 To be able to make a successful journey with your button fern, you have to ensure that the following care and maintenance practices are employed.. Do not wait for the soil to dry completely before watering because it’s going to dehydrate your button fern.. Check The Soil Regularly The best thing to know when your button fern needs water is to check the soil every day.. You do not need to worry about watering your button ferns.. High humidity is favorable for most ferns including button fern.. Increase or Decrease Water Water adjustment is a solution that looks simple but can address numerous problems in a button ferns.. Prune your Button Fern Removing extra leaves during hot seasons would help your button fern conserve moisture.. Trimming off your button fern can do a lot of benefits to your fern.. Button Fern Leaves Curling A quick fix to an overfertilized plant is to leach off the excess fertilizer with water.. To avoid this, make sure to provide enough water to your button fern.

High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants.. A Complete Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Updated 2021 Watering Your Lemon Button Fern.. Temperature Humidity For Your Lemon Button Fern.. How to Care for Lemon Button Ferns.. For Lemon Button fern soil you can use any well-draining houseplant soil but a loose peaty soil mix would be best.. Pellaea Rotundifolia Button Fern Hanging Plants Indoor Fern Houseplant Button Fern. Pellaea Rotundifolia Care Growing The Button Fern Button Fern Ferns Care Fern Houseplant. Lemon Button Fern 4 Pot Nephrolepis Cordifolia Duffii Live Plant Walmart Com Button Fern Plants Ferns Care

Lemon button ferns.. How to Care for Lemon Button Fern Light and Temperature.. Lemon Button Fern Care Soil.. The Lemon Button fern is not very.. How to Care for Lemon Button Ferns.. Lemon Button Fern Care Tips For Growing Lemon Button Ferns.. Includes tips on light water humidity fertilizing and more.. Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Nephrolepis Cordifolia Ferns Care Button Fern Indoor Plant Care. Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Nephrolepis Cordifolia Indoor Home Garden Ferns Care Button Fern Fern Care Indoor. Lemon Button Fern Button Fern Plants Shade Plants. Terrarium Plant Profile Nephrolepis Cordifolia Duffii Lemon Button Fern Video Shade Plants Terrarium Plants Button Fern. Lemon Button Fern Care Tips For Growing Lemon Button Ferns Ferns Care Container Gardening Vegetables Plants. Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Nephrolepis Cordifolia Indoor Home Garden Ferns Care Button Fern Fern Houseplant

Whether you are after positive energy, wealth, luck, or simply a lovely house plant, the Money Tree is a durable option for all plant lovers.. Money trees love water but not all of the time.. Frequently mist the leaves, or place them on a watered pebble tray to increase humidity levels if you live in a dry area.. A Peat-moss based soil is the best soil for Money Trees.. If you want your plant to stay small in a bonsai style, it only needs basic plant fertilizer three times a year.. You can clean your money tree by showering the plant with water.. Yellow leaves may be caused by low humidity or fertilizer imbalances.. Sometimes, spots develop on money tree leaves.

Button-shaped leaves with a slight lemon scent given lemon button fern Nephrolepis cordifolia Duffii its nameAlso called button sword fern or erect sword fern lemon button fern is a frost-tender perennial thats usually grown as a beautiful houseplant but it also grows outdoors year round in US.. Nephrolepis Cordifolia Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Vivarium Plants Ferns Care Button Fern Types Of Fern Plants. Nephrolepis Cordifolia Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Vivarium Plants Ferns Care Boston Ferns Care Boston Fern. Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Nephrolepis Cordifolia Indoor Home Garden Ferns Care Button Fern Fern Care Indoor. 4 Lemon Button Fern Nephrolepis Cordifolia Duffii Etsy In 2021 Button Fern Red Plants Fern Plant. How To Grow A Lemon Button Fern The Hardy Fern You Ve Been Searching For Button Fern House Plant Care Fern Plant. How To Grow A Lemon Button Fern The Hardy Fern You Ve Been Searching For Button Fern Artificial Plants Plant Care. Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Nephrolepis Cordifolia Indoor Home Garden Button Fern Indoor Fern Plants Ferns Care. A Complete Lemon Button Fern Care Guide Updated 2021 Cellar Door Plants Plants Ferns Care Button Fern. How To Grow A Lemon Button Fern The Hardy Fern You Ve Been Searching For Button Fern Lemon Button Fern Ferns. Lemon Button Fern Care Tips For Growing Lemon Button Ferns In 2021 Ferns Care How To Grow Lemon Button Fern. Lemon Button Fern 4 Pot Nephrolepis Cordifolia Duffii Live Plant Walmart Com Button Fern Plants Ferns Care. Pellaea Rotundifolia Button Fern Care Guide Vivarium Plants Ferns Care Button Fern Types Of Ferns

This Peperomia Green Bean care guide will prepare you for bringing this new plant into your home or office!. The plant thrives in a range of light conditions, making it suitable for poorly lit indoor areas.. When watering , thoroughly water the potting mix, then allow it to drain.. Extremely low light conditions can result in delayed growth.. You can actually even turn those pruned pieces of plant into propagations – keep reading to learn more!. Peperomia Green Beans are propagated from leaf cuttings.. You can directly germinate the Peperomia propagation cuttings in a potting mix, or you can put them in water and wait for roots to grow before transferring them to a pot.. The Peperomia Green Bean is not toxic to humans and pets; though, its leaves should not be confused with green beans.. Enjoyed reading the Peperomia Green Bean Care Guide?. While the Peperomia Green Bean does not like to be in full, direct sunlight, it prefers to live in places of medium to bright, indirect light.. Their leaves are designed to hold water but misting helps to add moisture to the air around the plant allowing it to thrive.. Their easy nature makes the Peperomia Green Bean a great starter plant for beginner gardeners.. Proper sunlight and water habits are crucial for the care of a Peperomia Green Bean.

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