Why Is My Boston Fern Dying? (And How To Fix It) - Smart Garden Guide (2022)

With delicate compound leaves and long, lance-shaped fronds that cascade delicately down the sides of its container, the Boston Fern is a perfect choice to bring a touch of the tropics indoors. While not difficult to look after, it does need the right conditions to thrive. This article covers the most common reasons for a Boston Fern dying, and will help you get your struggling plant back to health.

The most common cause of a Boston Fern dying is overwatering or persistently waterlogged conditions. This results in root rot, that will quickly kill your plant. Low humidity, underwatering, overfertilizing, pests, or incorrect lighting can also lead to a decline or death of your plant over time.

This article is going to cover each problem in turn, and help you to adjust the growing conditions and make some changes to restore your plant to its former glory.

6 Reasons Why Your Boston Fern Is Dying

Although Boston Ferns (Nephrolepis exaltata) are pretty hardy, it’s not unusual for them to droop sadly, lose their lush foliage or turn brown.

If you think that your Boston Fern is knocking on death’s door, don’t panic. In most cases, it is completely possible to revive this plant with a little care and damage control.

Overwatering Is The Most Common Cause Of A Boston Fern Dying

All kinds of ferns like to sit in well-hydrated soil. However, they like a happy medium, where the soil remains moist but never stays soggy. Overwatering is one of the most common causes of a Boston Fern dying.

An overwatered Boston Fern will show its displeasure through yellowing and wilting leaves. Waterlogged soil causes the plant to develop root rot or other diseases. Once root rot sets in, it can be difficult to save the plant, so prevention is the aim of the game.

Look for the following symptoms of overwatering;

(Video) How To Care For A Fern | How To Revive a Dying Fern | How To Make Humidity

  • Your Boston Fern is drooping, despite the soil being wet.
  • The fronds are turning yellow, particularly the lower fronds first.
  • The tips of the fronds are turning brown, despite plenty of water and humidity.
  • It takes a long time for the soil to dry out after watering.
  • You may detect an offensive smell from the soil. This is often an indicator of root rot.

So you think your Boston Fern has been overwatered and might have root rot, but how did this happen? Even if you’re careful with watering, there are a number of other factors to consider.

Your Boston Fern is more likely to develop root rot in the following conditions;

  • Your Boston Fern is in a pot that is too large. The soil will take an excessively long time to dry out after watering, leading to prolonged, soggy conditions.
  • Your pot has no or few drainage holes, so excess water cannot drain after watering.
  • You forget to empty the drip tray or outer pot after watering, leaving the roots sitting in water.
  • Your plant is in low light. Your Boston Fern will grow much more slowly and use less water in low light, leading to prolonged soggy soil after watering.
  • You forget to reduce watering in winter. Boston Ferns usually stop growing in winter, so you must respond by reducing how much and how often you water them.

How To Fix A Boston Fern Dying From Overwatering

If you think your plant has been overwatered and is showing some of the above symptoms, you should follow these steps to fix your dying Boston Fern.

  • Gently slide your Boston Fern out of the pot and remove excess soil to inspect the roots.
  • Rotten roots will be black/brown, fragile, mushy, and will likely have an offensive smell. You should prune off all affected roots with sterile pruning shears. If you have to prune many roots, you should also prune the foliage back so that the remaining roots can support the plant.
  • Gently rinse the healthy roots to remove as much of the old soil as possible. The old soil will still contain the pathogens that caused root rot, so it is best to plant in fresh soil.
  • Choose a new pot that is just a little larger than the plant. Make sure it has plenty of drainage holes.
  • Repot your Boston Fern using a well-draining houseplant potting mix, ideally with additional perlite or coarse sand to improve drainage.
  • Only water your Boston Fern once the top 1-2 inches of soil feels dry, rather than watering on a schedule.
  • Read my guide to fixing overwatered plants for more information.
Why Is My Boston Fern Dying? (And How To Fix It) - Smart Garden Guide (1)

Humidity Problems

Boston Ferns call tropical rainforests home, so naturally, they love an environment with lots of humidity. If the air inside your home is too dry, it might cause its foliage to curl up and turn brown. Also, your Boston Fern absolutely hates to be placed in front of, or near sources of warm drafts such as radiators, fires, or heating vents.

Humidity levels of at least 50% are required to keep your Boston Fern looking its best. Bear in mind that humidity levels tend to decrease in winter, as indoor heating systems tend to dry the air.

I use a digital hygrometer (humidity meter) to monitor humidity levels for my houseplants. This lets me know when I need to take a little action to boost humidity levels. Here is a link to the digital hygrometer I use.

How To Improve Humidity For Your Boston Fern

  • Group your plants together. The collective transpiration from the foliage increases local humidity.
  • Use a humidity tray. Place some pebbles in a large, shallow dish, before setting your plant on the pebbles. Fill the tray with a shallow layer of water, taking care that the water levels remain below the top of the pebbles. We don’t want the plant pot sitting in water, as this can encourage root rot.
  • Use a humidifier to quickly and effectively improve humidity levels.
  • Avoid misting your houseplants, as this tends to be surprisingly ineffective at raising humidity levels, and increases the risk of fungal and bacterial disease.
  • Read my guide to improving humidity for houseplants here.

High humidity seldom poses a problem for Boston Ferns. However, lots of humidity and low ventilation can cause the plant to attract disease.

Lighting Issues

If your Boston Fern is shedding leaves by the dozen and is not the same bouncy plant that you brought home, it might be a signal that it is not getting the light that it needs to produce lush green fronds.

(Video) Stop Killing Your Boston Ferns! Full Care Guide

This plant is fond of lots of bright, indirect light – just as it receives on the rainforest floor through the canopy of trees. This is why it is advisable to place it near a window that gets ample indirect sunshine. It will be ecstatic if you place it in an area that gets a bit of morning sun and then lots of diffused sunlight in the later part of the day.

Remember that while a Boston Fern is unlikely to actually die when kept in a shaded location, it will not grow and flourish. Low light also increases the risk of overwatering, and a plant weakened by insufficient light can also be more susceptible to pests and diseases

At the other end of the lighting spectrum, the Boston Fern also dislikes being exposed to too much direct sun. Prolonged exposure to direct sunlight will scorch its tender foliage and cause the frond tips to turn brown.

Underwatering

Whilst a less difficult problem to identify and treat, underwatering can also result in a Boston Fern dying. Boston Ferns require soil that never dries out fully. If they are left without water for even a short period of time, the fronds will start to turn progressively brown, and your Boston Fern will start to look pretty sad.

Underwatering is a very easy mistake to make. We all lead busy lives, and it isn’t always easy to remember to water your plants. Here are some good ways to avoid underwatering.

  • Put your plant somewhere you will see it on a regular basis, rather than tucked away in a corner. You’re much more likely to spot the first signs of trouble.
  • Develop a regular habit for checking your houseplants. Tie this into your normal daily routine, so its almost automatic for you to give your plants a quick check.
  • If you are forgetful or are going to be away for a while, consider using a self-watering pot or one of these methods to ensure your plant doesn’t dry out.
Why Is My Boston Fern Dying? (And How To Fix It) - Smart Garden Guide (2)

Pest Infestation

Just like most houseplants, Boston Ferns are susceptible to pest infestations. These pests can seriously damage the plant and can even result in your Boston Fern dying if left untreated.

Pests can often be identified if you inspect your plant closely on a regular basis, but some, such as spider mites, are so tiny that they are easily overlooked.

Many pests will damage your Boston Fern, resulting in yellow/brown leaves, generalized wilting, and a plant that is failing to thrive.

(Video) How I Didn’t Kill My Boston Fern

The best way to ensure that pests don’t cause your Boston Fern too much trouble is by inspecting your plant on a regular basis. Check the leaves, making sure to look at both sides, along with the stems and soil, for any evidence of pests.

Spider mites can be one of the most devastating pests to deal with. Look for fine wispy webs between the fronds, and if you look really closely, you should be able to see a swarm of spider mites.

Mealybugs are another example of common pests that pose a serious threat to your Boston Fern. These tiny, white cotton-like insects are visible to the naked eye and usually attack the underside of the leaves and roots of the plant. If not tackled in time, both mealybugs and spider mites can result in your Boston Fern dying.

Boston Ferns are also commonly troubled by fungus gnats and scale insects – both of which are difficult to spot. Fungus gnat larvae are present in the soil where they feed on the plant’s roots, thereby damaging them.

Scale insects, on the other hand, prefer living on the stem and leaves of the Boston Fern. Severe scale insect infestation might lead to stunted growth or even death of the plant.

What To Do If Your Boston Fern Is Dying Due To Pests?

The first and most important step is to quarantine your plant from any other houseplants to prevent the pests from spreading.

I normally physically remove as many pests as I can, either individually in the case of mealybugs or scale, or by using a showerhead or hose to gently wash as many of the pests off the plant as possible.

Once most or all of the pests have been removed, I like to treat my houseplants with either horticultural oil spray or neem oil solution, both of which are safe and fairly effective. I normally treat at weekly intervals until I haven’t spotted any pests for at least a fortnight.

Only once you’re absolutely sure all of the pests have been dealt with should you bring your Boston Fern back into contact with your other plants.

(Video) WATCH THIS FERN GROW BACK AFTER WINTER

Read my guide to identifying, treating, and preventing common houseplant pests to learn more.

Is Your Boston Fern Dying Due To Overfertilizing?

Let’s admit it – overfertilizing houseplants is a really easy mistake to make. It’s so tempting to fertilize a little bit too often or enthusiastically in an effort to make our plants grow quicker and become even more impressive. And in our enthusiasm, we sometimes overfeed the plant.

Overfertilizing can cause direct toxicity to the foliage, resulting in brown fronds, particularly at the tips and edges. With more severe overfertilizing, root toxicity develops, which can damage or even kill the roots.

This prevents the plant from absorbing essential water and nutrients, so the whole plant can start to wilt, develop yellowing lower fronds, have stunted growth, or even result in your Boston Fern dying completely.

You may also see white/yellowish salt deposition on the soil surface, which can be a sign of excess fertilizer.

How To Fix A Boston Fern That Is Dying From Overfertilizing

If you think you’ve been fertilizing your Boston Fern too much, and it’s starting to struggle there are two options.

Option 1 – Flush the soil by running copious amounts of water through it for several minutes. This helps to wash excess fertilizer salts out of the soil. After this, avoid fertilizing for 6 months, and then resume a more conservative regime.

Option 2 – Repot your plant into fresh potting soil. This will cause more immediate stress for an aready struggling plant, but is often the right move for a severely impacted plant, as a last resort to save a dying Boston Fern.

Boston Ferns aren’t heavy feeders, so a dilute, balanced fertilizer applied every 2-3 months is plenty to keep a Boston Fern thriving. Here is a link to the fertilizer I use for my Boston Fern. There is no need to fertilize a Boston Fern during the winter months when growth will be very slow.

(Video) Fern Maintenance | Save a Dying Fern | Soooo Much Crisping 😭

Last Word

If it looks like your Boston Fern is dying, it’s likely one of the problems discussed in this article. Thankfully, most problems can be correctly identified by taking a close look at the plant and the conditions that it is growing in.

Root rot and pests require immediate attention to save your plant, while some of the other issues simply need a slight adjustment in the care conditions.

Looking after houseplants is a constant learning process, and sometimes plants struggle despite out best efforts. And when you encounter another of your houseplants struggling, just remember that an expert in any field has failed more times than the novice has even tried!

FAQs

How do you bring back a dying Boston fern? ›

As long as there are at least a few healthy green leaves on your fern (even one), there is a chance to bring them back. Prune all dead foliage. Once the fronds have died off, they won't miraculously spring back to life. You can trim fronds that are only partially dried.

How do I bring my fern back to health? ›

Water the fern with lukewarm water rather the hot or cold water. Most indoor ferns are tropical plants and watering with lukewarm water replicates their natural conditions. If the water is very cold then this can cause shock to their sensitive roots which can contribute to the leaves turning brown.

What does an overwatered Boston fern look like? ›

Although Boston fern prefers slightly moist soil, it is likely to develop rot and other fungal diseases in soggy, waterlogged soil. The first sign that a fern is overwatered is usually yellowing or wilted leaves. One surefire way to determine if it's time to water a Boston fern is to touch the soil with your fingertip.

Why is my Boston fern leaves turning brown and falling off? ›

Boston Ferns get brown leaves due to underwatering, low relative humidity, too much sun exposure, and temperatures extremes. Other sources of stress can cause brown leaves, such as overfertilization and transplant shock, as well as normal causes such as acclimation or aging foliage.

Can you save a dying fern? ›

Most ferns are hardy plants so they revive back in a few weeks after you correct the problematic conditions. The good news is that if the fern is dead, which is usual in cold temperatures during winter, it will grow back in spring once the temperatures go up!

Why is my fern turning brown and crispy? ›

The tips of ferns turn brown due to underwatering. Ferns require the soil to be consistently moist, but not saturated. If the soil dries out between bouts of watering, the fern's leaves turn brown and crispy at the tips due to a lack of moisture around the roots. Smaller pots dry out more quickly.

Should you cut off dead fern leaves? ›

Ferns have fronds, rather than leaves, which last for only a year or so. The older fronds start to die back and turn brown while the new ones grow in. Cutting off the old growth will refresh the plant and leave you with only beautiful new fronds.

Is Epsom salt good for Boston ferns? ›

And they can lose these substances over time through watering. Epsom salt to the rescue! Epsom salt has minerals perfect for fern growth and fern care.

How often do you water Boston ferns? ›

Many people fear they will overwater their fern but Boston ferns crave water and need daily watering when outdoors, especial on hot summer days. On really hot days it's a good idea to water your fern twice a day.

What is the best way to water a Boston fern? ›

Water. Boston Ferns enjoy weekly watering sessions, keeping their soil moist but not wet. Allow the top 2' of soil to dry out between waterings during winter.

Do Boston ferns need a lot of light? ›

Boston ferns are the perfect porch plant, as they thrive in lots of indirect light. Morning sun is ideal, as full afternoon sun can burn the fronds. They like consistently moist but well-drained soils. Boston ferns grown indoors should be placed near a window, but not in direct sunlight.

What is a good fertilizer for Boston ferns? ›

Use Miracle-Gro® Water Soluble All Purpose Plant Food for larger Boston ferns and those grown outdoors, and Miracle-Gro® Indoor Plant Food for smaller indoor Boston ferns. The amount you use to fertilize your fern will vary depending on its size, so be sure to follow the instructions on the label.

Will leaves grow back on fern? ›

Ferns will grow back robustly after cutting, and the emergence of new fronds will be most abundant in the growing season. It is important to remember that the new growth will not come from the cut site, and so the whole frond should be removed once you've decided to cut back.

How often should you water ferns? ›

Hanging Ferns make wonderful houseplants and they are easy to maintain, providing you focus on getting the watering right. This is much easier than you might think it is. It is best to water hanging ferns 2-3 times per week.

Why does my fern look like it's dying? ›

All kinds of ferns like to sit in well-hydrated soil. However, they like a happy medium, where the soil remains moist but never stays soggy. Overwatering is one of the most common causes of a Boston Fern dying. An overwatered Boston Fern will show its displeasure through yellowing and wilting leaves.

What is wrong with my Boston fern? ›

Why is My Boston Fern Turning Brown? Boston fern browning may be caused by poor soil, inadequate drainage, lack of water or humidity, too much light, excess salt, or simply mechanical injury. If your cat tends to chew on the leaves, the tips will turn brown and die.

How do you keep a fern from dying? ›

Most ferns do fine with partial shade or intermittent, dappled sunlight. Add a layer of compost, leaves or wood chips around the base of the fern if its fronds droop between watering. The mulch will help the fern retain moisture. Refrain from feeding your fern so you don't burn its leaves.

How long do Boston ferns live? ›

Indoor ferns can last for many years – even decades – with proper care and attention. One family in Virginia claim to have maintained their Boston fern for over 114 years! With re-potting and propagation, single plants can be regenerated again and again, making such advanced ages possible.

Should you mist ferns? ›

Using a mist spray three or four times a day will help to maintain luxuriant growth. Misting is good for broad-leaf ferns and those of simple-leaf forms. Use less spray on crinkled varieties, which tend to collect moisture and hold it, contributing to development of fungus.

Should I cut off the brown parts of my fern? ›

This raises the question: should you cut back the brown leaves to protect your ferns? Cutting back brown fronds is good practice, and almost always benefits the plant. As well as improving the appearance of the fern, it reduces the risk of disease and stimulates new, healthy growth.

How do you keep Boston ferns alive in the winter? ›

The plant needs cool nighttime temps and lots of bright, indirect light like that from a south window not blocked by trees or buildings. Daytime temperatures should not be over 75 degrees F. (24 C.). High humidity is necessary to keep the Boston fern as a houseplant.

Do ferns like coffee grounds? ›

It's also vital to use coffee grounds in a way that won't harm your plants or the microorganisms in the soil. The simple answer is that yes, ferns love coffee!

What's the best fertilizer for ferns? ›

Fertilization. Ferns are relatively light feeders compared to many other foliage plants. They prefer a balanced fertilizer, such as 20-10-20 or 20-20-20, with micronutrients applied at approximately 200 ppm nitrogen. Too much nitrogen can cause tip burn on the roots and leaves if the plant becomes dry.

How do you keep Boston ferns healthy? ›

For extra humidity care for Boston fern, try setting your fern's pot on a tray of pebbles filled with water. You can also try lightly misting your fern once or twice a week to help it get the humidity it needs. Another step in how to take care of a Boston fern is to make sure that the fern's soil remains damp.

Can you water ferns with tap water? ›

Tap water in most municipal areas is chlorinated, and many plants (like ferns, aroids, and many orchids) suffer from any chlorine in the water.

Can Boston fern take full sun? ›

Houseplants such as the Boston fern, or the Japanese Painted Fern and Christmas fern grow best in shady areas while the bracken fern prefers light shade to full sun. Some fern varieties tolerate direct sunlight, but only if you plant them in consistently moist, fertile soil.

What kind of pots do ferns like? ›

Both plastic and clay pots are suitable for ferns, with those in plastic pots requiring less frequent watering. Pots should be large enough to accommodate the roots with an extra inch of space for further growth. Fern roots tend to be shallow, so short containers are best.

Where should I place my Boston fern? ›

Boston fern does best when grown in a location with bright, indirect light. Too much shade can result in sparse fronds that appear lackluster, and too much sun can burn the fronds. For this reason, Boston fern is a good choice for a porch plant that receives filtered sun in the morning and afternoon shade.

How much sun does a Boston fern need? ›

A location where the plant gets at least two hours of indirect sunlight per day, preferably in the morning or late afternoon, is ideal. Boston fern light conditions must change when sunlight is more intense in spring and summer.

Does Boston fern need fertilizer? ›

In the spring and summer, Boston ferns need to be fertilized once a month. The proper Boston fern fertilizer to use in summer is a water soluble fertilizer mixed at half strength. The fertilizer should have an NPK ratio of 20-10-20.

How do you save a dead Boston fern? ›

Trim the drooping fronds back to about 2 inches long and leave any healthy upright fronds in the center of the plant intact. If all fronds are drying and dying, trim them all to 2 inches. Clean out the dead leaves and check the soil for offsets -- baby ferns -- which can be separated and planted in their own pots.

Why is my Boston fern dying? ›

The most common cause of a Boston Fern dying is overwatering or persistently waterlogged conditions. This results in root rot, that will quickly kill your plant. Low humidity, underwatering, overfertilizing, pests, or incorrect lighting can also lead to a decline or death of your plant over time.

Is my Boston fern dead? ›

Dig up the roots and examine them if the fern still fails to produce new growth. If the roots appear healthy and living, then the fern may need more time to put forth a new flush of fronds. Roots that are either rotten and soft or dry and brittle indicate the fern has died.

Should I cut off brown fern leaves? ›

Clip away any brown leaves or fronds with a pair of sharp garden clippers. Removing the dead, brown leaves makes the plant grow more quickly as it encourages new growth. Do this in late winter to early spring, before new growth begins.

Is Epsom salt good for Boston ferns? ›

And they can lose these substances over time through watering. Epsom salt to the rescue! Epsom salt has minerals perfect for fern growth and fern care.

How often should I water Boston ferns? ›

Many people fear they will overwater their fern but Boston ferns crave water and need daily watering when outdoors, especial on hot summer days. On really hot days it's a good idea to water your fern twice a day.

Do Boston ferns need full sun? ›

Boston ferns are the perfect porch plant, as they thrive in lots of indirect light. Morning sun is ideal, as full afternoon sun can burn the fronds. In humid, subtropical areas of Florida (zones 10 to 12), Boston ferns make an attractive mid-height groundcover in areas with dappled shade.

What is a good fertilizer for Boston ferns? ›

In the spring and summer, Boston ferns need to be fertilized once a month. The proper Boston fern fertilizer to use in summer is a water soluble fertilizer mixed at half strength. The fertilizer should have an NPK ratio of 20-10-20.

How do you keep ferns alive? ›

Most ferns like an evenly moist soil with regular waterings. Allowing the soil to dry out between waterings stresses these plants. Bushy ferns can be difficult to water. Try using a watering can with a long spout to direct the water to the center of the plant.

Will my ferns grow back? ›

Ferns plants in the ground can be left as is the entire winter. The fronds will protect the plant's center crown, where new growth will emerge in the spring. Ferns are a hardy perennial plant that will grow back each year. Many gardeners bring potted ferns indoors to continue growing during the cold weather season.

How much light does a Boston fern need? ›

A location where the plant gets at least two hours of indirect sunlight per day, preferably in the morning or late afternoon, is ideal. Boston fern light conditions must change when sunlight is more intense in spring and summer.

How long do Boston ferns live? ›

Indoor ferns can last for many years – even decades – with proper care and attention. One family in Virginia claim to have maintained their Boston fern for over 114 years! With re-potting and propagation, single plants can be regenerated again and again, making such advanced ages possible.

How do you make Boston ferns bushy? ›

You don't want to crop the top of the plant when pruning Boston fern. Instead, trim off the side fronds at the base. Also remove old, discolored fronds near the soil to allow new growth to come through. Remove the unsightly stems to the base as well.

How do you keep Boston ferns alive in the winter? ›

The plant needs cool nighttime temps and lots of bright, indirect light like that from a south window not blocked by trees or buildings. Daytime temperatures should not be over 75 degrees F. (24 C.). High humidity is necessary to keep the Boston fern as a houseplant.

With delicate compound leaves and long, lance-shaped fronds that cascade delicately down the sides of its container, the Boston Fern is a perfect choice to bring a touch of the tropics indoors. While not difficult to look after, it does need the right conditions to thrive. This article covers the m...

It takes a long time for the soil to dry out after watering.. Your pot has no or few drainage holes, so excess water cannot drain after watering.. Your Boston Fern will grow much more slowly and use less water in low light, leading to prolonged soggy soil after watering.. Gently slide your Boston Fern out of the pot and remove excess soil to inspect the roots.. The old soil will still contain the pathogens that caused root rot, so it is best to plant in fresh soil.. We don’t want the plant pot sitting in water, as this can encourage root rot.. Low light also increases the risk of overwatering, and a plant weakened by insufficient light can also be more susceptible to pests and diseases. Whilst a less difficult problem to identify and treat, underwatering can also result in a Boston Fern dying.. Read my guide to identifying, treating, and preventing common houseplant pests to learn more.. How To Fix A Boston Fern That Is Dying From Overfertilizing If you think you’ve been fertilizing your Boston Fern too much, and it’s starting to struggle there are two options.

Boston fern is one of the most popular plants because it’s easy to care for. Whether it’s grown indoors or outdoors, Boston fern doesn’t need a lot of sunlight and thrives in humid areas. It’s

But Boston fern brown tips affect the look of your beautiful plant.. Having brown tips is quite common when you’re growing Boston fern because this plant is sensitive to light and humidity.. Bright indirect sunlight is essential for Boston fern foliage to grow and stay green, but when it’s exposed to too much light, the tips of your fern will turn brown.. However, too much watering will make the tips of your Boston fern turn brown and can eventually lead to root rot.. This plant is sensitive to temperature and humidity, so any change in these factors will turn the leaf tips brown, and the plant will eventually die.. If you’re growing your Boston fern in clogged or low-draining soil, the tips of your plant will turn brown, and then it will eventually die due to root rot.. You should make sure that you’re growing your Boston fern in good-draining soil and only water the plant when the soil is slightly dry.

Trim the drooping fronds back to about 2 inches long and leave any healthy upright fronds in the center of the plant intact. If all fronds are drying and dying, trim them all to 2 inches. Clean out the dead leaves and check the soil for offsets -- baby ferns -- which can be separated and planted in their own pots.

If you’re seeing brown leaves all over, your fern may not be getting enough moisture .. The old, dead and dying fronds should be pruned away to make room for the new growth.. If the soil dries out between bouts of watering, the fern’s leaves turn brown and crispy at the tips due to a lack of moisture around the roots.. If you find your indoor fern’s fronds frequently die back, check the soil.. Ferns grown in light, sandy soil require more frequent watering than those grown in dense clay soil.

It can be very frustrating to know that you have made a mistake with one of your plants. Sometimes you might get distracted and this can lead to one of your plants not being cared

If you click an affiliate link and make a purchase, I might earn a commission.. First, you will learn about what you’re going to have to do to revive an indoor fern.. Indoor ferns and outdoor ferns are going to differ when it comes to what they like and expect.. Certain types of ferns are going to do better with very wet soil while some others will do better with less moisture than that.. What if you’re watering your fern properly and it has the right drainage that it needs?. You can encounter issues with your ferns if your home is too dried out during the winter, too.. Do what you can to increase the humidity around your fern to make it better.. Indoor ferns do like fertilizer and it’s a good idea to use it.. Too much fertilizer runs the risk of burning the leaves and you don’t want to have to cut off fronds because you used too much fertilizer.. The first thing that you want to do is make sure that the fern has properly draining soil.. Remember that you don’t really need to feed your outdoor fern with fertilizer either.. Once you know what these plants like, it’s so much simpler to take care of them.

Our Boston fern indoor care guide will have you growing a beautiful plant with long, green arching fronds. Great for a hanging basket or pedestal.

Boston fern propagation is also very easy, so it’s simple to give pieces of the fern to friends or to start a new plant of your own.. Boston ferns are known to be one of the easiest plants to grow indoors since they do not require a lot of specialized care.. Boston fern indoor care includes keeping the soil watered consistently.. Otherwise, your Boston fern indoor care could include spraying the fern with a mist of water every day.. Though Boston fern indoor care includes keeping the soil moist, don’t let it stay very wet or the roots can start to rot.. Since Boston ferns can grow to be very large, their roots can start to take up too much space in the pot as the plant grows.. If the plant starts to outgrow its pot, it’s time to repot the fern or at least part of the fern.. If you just want to repot a portion of the fern, let the soil dry out a little bit and remove the fern from the pot.. Place both potions of the fern into the pots that you would like to use, add new soil, and water the ferns.. Even if the fern has not outgrown its pot, it’s best for Boston fern indoor care to repot the plant in fresh soil each spring.. Most Boston fern indoor care problems come from improper temperature, humidity, and watering.. Overall, Boston ferns are an easy plant to keep indoors or on a patio.. Due to the plant’s resilient nature, Boston fern indoor care is pretty simple.

Boston ferns are great for outdoor patios and porches, but if winter temperatures drop below 75℉ during the day, then wintering Boston ferns becomes a must.

If you live in a subtropical area, you might be able to leave your Boston fern outside for the winter and care for it as you usually would.. However, if the winter temperatures in your area consistently drop below 75℉ during the day, you will need to learn more about Boston fern winter care and in addition to this article, our comprehensive Boston fern indoor care guide may be helpful.. If you live in a climate that requires specific Boston fern winter care, it will likely grow to be a medium-sized houseplant.. Learning to winter Boston ferns ensures that you can continue to enjoy your plant regardless of the temperature.. To winter Boston ferns indoors, place them near a window.. If you are planning to winter Boston ferns indoors, you will likely need to ensure you have a good watering regime , and perhaps water it a little more often, so that the soil doesn’t dry out.. Humidity is very important, especially when wintering Boston ferns indoors.. Good Boston fern winter care can include letting the plant go dormant.. If you are wintering Boston ferns, don’t fertilize them during the winter.. When preparing for wintering Boston ferns, plan to prune the leaves.. If you would like your Boston fern to survive cold winter temperatures so you can continue to enjoy it in future seasons, it’s important to learn how to winter Boston ferns with care.Wintering Boston ferns isn’t especially difficult, but the plant does require specific conditions in order to thrive.. If you provide the correct conditions for wintering your Boston fern well indoors, it will survive the winter and continue to thrive in the following spring and summer months.

A blow in a dream can mean both a symbolic kick of fate and a very real event. Why do you dream that you were hit or you beat someone? The dream interpretation will try to illuminate all possible options.If you happened to get hit in a dream, Miller’s dreambook believes that in reality you will be i...

Why do you dream that you were hit or you beat someone?. What does it mean in a dream to receive an unexpected punch from a stranger ?. To see a familiar man hit a girl in a dream means that someone is trying to achieve his goal by any means.. Punching another person yourself – predicts a successful conclusion of the matter.. In general, the dream book believes that beating a husband or wife in a dream is good.. Beating your beloved woman - means her betrayal; a rival - means a stupid act in reality.

Videos

1. My Fern Fronds Are Turning Brown
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2. How to save dying fern? | Fern indoor Plants | Fern Saplings |Hack to save the plant |How to video
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3. How Did My Boston Ferns Survived for Two years? Sharing my Secret. #gardening #fernscare #HNTVBAGUIO
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4. How To Restore Ferns / Indoors / Outdoors / Plants
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5. How to avoid a Fern from dying?
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6. Boston Fern Rejuvenation and Division
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